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Moray Council outlines hydrogen fuel roadmap


By Alan Beresford

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Public hydrogen refuelling stations are likely to be situated at points across Moray. Inset: Economic development and infrastructure services committee chairman Councillor Marc Macrae.
Public hydrogen refuelling stations are likely to be situated at points across Moray. Inset: Economic development and infrastructure services committee chairman Councillor Marc Macrae.

MORAY Council has adopted a plan to kick-start a hydrogen economy.

The roadmap drives forward the council’s ambition to use the zero carbon emissions fuel to deliver a substantial amount of the area’s energy and service needs to transition to a low carbon future.

The local authority will consider piloting a small number of hydrogen vehicles within its fleet using hydrogen produced elsewhere in a move to provide demand for the fuel.

Public hydrogen refuelling stations are likely to be put in at Barmuckity on the A96 near Elgin and at Aberlour, where traffic flows are high and whisky distilleries could provide demand.

Buckie has potential for a refuelling station for the maritime industry with investigations into a dual purpose refuelling station to be considered in due course.

The council will also look at how its hydrogen strategy can feed into the development of the Moray Local Development Plan 2027.

The roadmap follows the local authority’s earlier adoption of the Moray Hydrogen Strategy.

Chairman of Moray Council’s economic development and infrastructure services committee, Councillor Marc Macrae (Conservative, Fochabers-Lhanbryde), said: “There’s a demand for hydrogen within Moray and it’s exciting to see opportunities to develop pilot projects, which would retain significant benefits within the area, come into clear view.

“A hydrogen economy in Moray would have many strings to its bow. It could address fuel poverty issues, particularly in our rural areas, while helping to reduce our greenhouse gas and particulate emissions. It could also improve the security of our energy supply and increase and make better use of local renewable energy generation.”



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