Home   News   Article

Self-isolation rules for key workers who are close contacts of a Covid-19 case in Scotland are to change


By Jonathan Clark

Easier access to your trusted, local news. Have a look at our brand new digital subscription packages!



CHANGES are to be made to self-isolation rules for close contacts of Covid-19 cases in Scotland to allow essential staff to continue working.

It is hoped that allowing fully-vaccinated key workers, who test negative for coronavirus, to continue working will help avoid staff shortages and maintain lifeline services and critical national infrastructure.

This will apply to people working in key areas such as health and social care, transport and the provision of food supplies.

Exemption will only be granted in respect of members of staff who voluntarily agree not to self isolate, and the employers’ duty of care to all their employees must be respected.

Staff must be double-vaccinated and in receipt of their second dose at least two weeks previously. They will also require to have a negative PCR test and undertake daily lateral flow tests.

Applications may be made via the Scottish Government website.

Exemptions will be made on a temporary basis and last only for as long as there is an immediate risk to business or service continuity.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said: “It is essential that lifeline services and critical national infrastructure are maintained and we are implementing these changes now – ahead of possible changes to self-isolation rules for close contacts that may apply more generally in future – to ensure staff shortages do not put key services at risk.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon.
First Minister Nicola Sturgeon.

“We have seen significant staff shortages in a small number of organisations in recent days and we have worked with them to protect services. Applications for exemptions are being considered from today and we will consider applications as they come in.

“Clinical evidence tells us we can safely and effectively release some critical staff from self-isolation, with appropriate safeguards.

"However, this is a very limited change at this stage, to be applied on a case-by-case basis and only where absolutely necessary.

“We will not allow key services to be threatened by staff shortages but equally we must continue to protect public health.”



Do you want to respond to this article? If so, click here to submit your thoughts and they may be published in print.


Keep up-to-date with important news from your community, and access exclusive, subscriber only content online. Read a copy of your favourite newspaper on any device via the brand new HNM App.

Learn more


This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More